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Microsoft Video 1 Compressor Download

  • FourCC: 'rle ' (note the space character, ASCII 0x20, needed to round our the FOURCC)
  • Company: Microsoft
  • Samples: http://samples.mplayerhq.hu/V-codecs/RLE/
Microsoft video 1 compressor downloads

This is a description of Microsoft's run length encoding (RLE) data format, as excerpted from their official documentation. MS RLE data can occur in both static BMP images and AVI animations.

Bitmap Compression

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Microsoft video 1 compressor

Windows versions 3.0 and later support run-length encoded (RLE) formats for compressing bitmaps that use 4 bits per pixel and 8 bits per pixel. Compression reduces the disk and memory storage required for a bitmap.

Compression of 8-Bits-per-Pixel Bitmaps

When the biCompression member of the BITMAPINFOHEADER structure is set to BI_RLE8, the DIB is compressed using a run-length encoded format for a 256-color bitmap. This format uses two modes: encoded mode and absolute mode. Both modes can occur anywhere throughout a single bitmap.

Encoded Mode

A unit of information in encoded mode consists of two bytes. The first byte specifies the number of consecutive pixels to be drawn using the color index contained in the second byte. The first byte of the pair can be set to zero to indicate an escape that denotes the end of a line, the end of the bitmap,or a delta. The interpretation of the escape depends on the value of the second byte of the pair, which must be in the range 0x00 through 0x02. Following are the meanings of the escape values that can be used in the second byte:

Absolute Mode

Absolute mode is signaled by the first byte in the pair being set to zero and the second byte to a value between 0x03 and 0xFF. The second byte represents the number of bytes that follow, each of which contains the color index of a single pixel. Each run must be aligned on a word boundary. Following is an example of an 8-bit RLE bitmap (the two-digit hexadecimal values in the second column represent a color index for a single pixel):

Compression of 4-Bits-per-Pixel Bitmaps

When the biCompression member of the BITMAPINFOHEADER structure is set to BI_RLE4, the DIB is compressed using a run-length encoded format for a 16-color bitmap. This format uses two modes: encoded mode and absolute mode.

Encoded Mode

A unit of information in encoded mode consists of two bytes. The first byte of the pair contains the number of pixels to be drawn using the color indexes in the second byte.

The second byte contains two color indexes, one in its high-order nibble (that is, its low-order 4 bits) and one in its low-order nibble.

The first pixel is drawn using the color specified by the high-order nibble, the second is drawn using the color in the low-order nibble, the third is drawn with the color in the high-order nibble, and so on, until all the pixels specified by the first byte have been drawn.

The first byte of the pair can be set to zero to indicate an escape that denotes the end of a line, the end of the bitmap, or a delta. The interpretation of the escape depends on the value of the second byte of the pair. In encoded mode, the second byte has a value in the range 0x00 through 0x02. The meaning of these values is the same as for a DIB with 8 bits per pixel.

Compressor

Absolute Mode

In absolute mode, the first byte contains zero, the second byte contains the number of color indexes that follow, and subsequent bytes contain color indexes in their high- and low-order nibbles, one color index for each pixel. Each run must be aligned on a word boundary. Following is an example of a 4-bit RLE bitmap (the one-digit hexadecimal values in the second column represent a color index for a single pixel):

Retrieved from 'https://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=Microsoft_RLE&oldid=5766'

Microsoft Video 1 or MS-CRAM[1] is an early lossy video compression and decompression algorithm (codec) that was released with version 1.0 of Microsoft'sVideo for Windows in November 1992. It is based on MotiVE, a vector quantization codec which Microsoft licensed from Media Vision. In 1993, Media Vision marketed the Pro Movie Spectrum, an ISA board that captured video in both raw and MSV1 formats (the MSV1 processing was done in hardware on the board).

Compression algorithm[edit]

Microsoft Video 1 operates either in an 8-bitpalettized color space or in a 15-bit RGB color space.[2] Each frame is split into 4×4 pixel blocks.[2] Each 4×4 pixel block can be coded in one of three modes: skip, 2-color or 8-color.[2] In skip mode, the content from the previous frame is copied to the current frame in a conditional replenishment fashion.[2] In 2-color mode, two colors per 4×4 block are transmitted, and 1 bit per pixel is used to select between the two colors.[2] In 8-color mode, the same scheme applies with 2 colors per 2×2 block.[2] This can be interpreted as a 2-color palette which is locally adapted on either a 4×4 block basis or a 2×2 block basis. Interpreted as vector quantization, vectors with components red, green, and blue are quantized using a forward adaptive codebook with two entries.

Use in NetShow Encoder[edit]

Windows

The codec was available in Microsoft NetShow Encoder,[3] which was later renamed Windows Media Encoder, and made available via the SDK. The NetShow encoder allowed the user to select a 2 pass option, where in the first pass the video was analyzed to create a color palette, and in the second pass converted to the palettized color space and encoded. Before encoding, the video could be scaled. Later versions of Windows Media Encoder dropped support for Microsoft Video 1 and only supported Windows Media Video.

See also[edit]

  • Block truncation coding, a similar coding technique for grayscale content
  • Color Cell Compression, a similar coding technique for color content, based on block truncation coding
  • Apple Video, a codec based on a similar design
  • QuickTime Graphics, a codec based on a similar design
  • Smacker video, a codec based on a similar design
  • S3 Texture Compression, a texture compression format based on a similar design

Microsoft Video 1 Compressor Download Free

References[edit]

  1. ^'Troubleshooting Video Codecs in Windows 95'. Support.microsoft.com. 2006-11-15. Retrieved 2009-10-25.
  2. ^ abcdefMike Melanson (13 March 2003). 'Description of the Microsoft Video-1 Decoding Algorithm'. Retrieved 5 April 2013.
  3. ^'Creating NetShow™ Video'. Microsoft. Archived from the original on 2014-01-12.

Microsoft Video 1 Compressor Downloader

External links[edit]

Microsoft Video 1 Compressor

Retrieved from 'https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Microsoft_Video_1&oldid=1001315569'