Posted  by  admin

Barry Harris Pdf

For more information on this and related topics, check out An Approach to Jazz Piano.

Get 5 FREE lessons: A Syllabus: Your Teachers: https://www.pi. Pianist Barry Harris’ method which outlines a more summarized, yet in-depth, approach to jazz harmony. Method adapted for guitar by Alan Kingstone. Thread: Kingstone/Harris Harmonic Method for Guitar I know there is a dedicated Barry Harris thread, but most of it is focussed on single line improvisation.

The major bebop scale has been in common knowledge for decades. I have outlined the tonic/dominant (IMa6 iiDim) polarity in an earlier blog (March, 2012). So check that out and you’ll see a few examples of some ideas for expanding upon that idea. OK, then comes Barry Harris (a well known jazz piano/educator) who instructs us with some mysterious sounding, but not necessarily rocket-science, ideas for the bebop scale. The scale: in C major: C D E F G G# A B C.
For starters, most jazz players these days will study the scale-tone sevenths of at least four or five different scale types, so most are familiar with playing scale-tone sevenths for example, in major scales in a step-wise root motion as in C major:
CMa7 Dmi7 Emi7 FMa7 G7 Ami7 Bmi7(b5) CMa7 and learning the modes that are often associated with those chords.
Barry Harris Pdf

Barry Harris Theory Books

I chanced upon a youtube video of Barry Harris working with (astonished) students and he did a similar thing except he played them over the bebop major scale. While paying strict attention to voice leading, each of the four voices, leads to the next note in the scale, creating a very interesting take on the bebop scale. This approach has a very similar effect to the C6 Ddim toggling-polarity application mentioned earlier, yet they sounded different and interesting. Scale-tone sevenths here start out as normal but quickly run into that added note G# (#5 or b6) so the chord qualities start to change quickly from that of the scale-tone sevenths in the pure major scale. I’ve outlined a few ideas from what I heard in B.H’s you-tube video, but basically here is the main theme:
Barry Harris Pdf


Notice there are eight scale-tone sevenths chords as opposed to seven in a major scale. Also notice that there are two mi7(b5) chords in the bebop major scale.
Barry Harris played them as triads over a bass note which are outlined below:
CMa7 Dmi7(b5) Emi11 FdimMa7 G9sus4 G#/AbdimMa7 AmiMa7 Bmi7(b5)

Barry Harris Guitar Pdf

PdfBarry Harris Pdf
The triads (numerator) over the bass notes can be inverted giving a greater range.

How are these used? They can be used much the same way as the C6/Ddim method. There is the same polarity evident with BH’s approach i.e. tonic dominant toggling. The exception to this would be the V7sus4 or F/G in our example. It’s not a tonic chord but it is an unresolved dominant so it can function also as an unresolved tonic in a way. Once this is looked at the next step (perhaps) could be to learn the associated modes of the major bebop scale. They will be the same as in a major scale except for the added #5/b6. BH quotes the bridge to My Funny Valentine as an example where this might be used—it sounds fantastic! But why is it so hard to learn in all keys and in all forms?Harris

Barry Harris Workshop Pdf


For more information on this and related topics, check out An Approach to Jazz Piano.

Barry Harris Pdf Scribd


Barry Harris 6th Diminished Scale

The Barry Harris Approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction By Fiona Bicket
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved. Issue 1.0
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Table of Contents Dr. Barry Harris Profile ...................................................................................................3 About the Author ...............................................................................................................3 Introduction.........................................................................................................................4 Part I – Improvised Lines ................................................................................................5 Scale runs ........................................................................................................................5 Some basic motifs .........................................................................................................7 Summary..........................................................................................................................9 Addendum 1: Song Example: Stay Right With It..............................................10 Addendum 2: Solo Example: Stay Right With It (third and fourth choruses)......11 Part II - Basic Chord Movement .................................................................................12 Sixth chords, long and short .....................................................................................12 Diminished chords, long and short .........................................................................13 Using the chords ..........................................................................................................16 Part III - Exploring the Sixth Diminished Scale ......................................................17 Major and Minor sixth diminished scales .............................................................17 Chord Scale ...................................................................................................................20 Practice Suggestion .....................................................................................................22 Summary........................................................................................................................25 List of Music Examples .................................................................................................26
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 2 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Dr. Barry Harris Profile Dr. Barry Harris is an Internationally renowned jazz pianist, composer and teacher. Dr. Harris is the recipient of an Honorary Doctorate from Northwestern University. He has received the Living Jazz Legacy award from the Mid-Atlantic Arts Association, and an American Jazz Masters Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. In addition, Dr. Harris received the Manhattan Borough President Award for Excellence. This award was given for recognition of his devoted public service and in honor of excellence in the field of music. He received the 1999 Mentor award for his work with youngsters at the Manhattan Country School in NYC. Dr. Harris began playing jazz in Detroit in the 1940’s. Bebop absorbed his attention, particularly the music of Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Bud Powell and Thelonious Monk. With an unrelenting inquiry into the nature of this music and his willingness to communicate it, Barry Harris now inspires and encourages many younger musicians. He’s come to be known as the “keeper of the bebop flame”. Dr. Barry Harris receives frequent requests to appear as a guest lecturer by Universities and various musical venues all over the world. His lectures and interactive instrument and vocal workshops focus on the complete aspects of music including improvisation, harmonic movement and theory. His schedule includes lectures in the United States, Holland, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and Japan. When he is not traveling, Dr. Harris holds weekly music workshop sessions in New York City for vocalists, students of piano & other instruments.
About the Author Ms. Fiona Bicket is a pianist and educator, specializing in music education for young children. She has been a student of Barry Harris and Walter Davis Jr, and was twice a semi-finalist in the Thelonious Monk International Piano Competition. Fiona Bicket has performed and taught extensively in Australia, her country of origin. She initially met Barry Harris at the now closed Jazz Cultural Theater in New York. She presently attends his weekly workshops in New York.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 3 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Introduction In his teaching, Dr. Barry Harris emphasizes a return to basics. He rejects the trend toward over-complication found in much modern jazz education. He says “Young people should be taught from where the teachers came from, not from where the teachers are.” Anyone who learns from Dr. Barry Harris is sure to be touched by a certain simplicity and freedom which stems from his attention to detail. He deals in an uncomplicated and relaxed manner with the musical elements which make up bebop. He points out two distinct areas of study: chording and soloing. With soloing he teaches scalar and melodic materials which have a very practical application through their rhythmic integrity (Part I). With chording, he instills an understanding of the sixth chord as the fundamental sound of jazz, along with the associated diminished chords, which allow movement within and between chords (Parts II & III). If you are a novice to jazz harmony, play the sequence of examples over and over to absorb the sound and movement. Then, read the text as a guide to the musical examples. The third part is the result of a two-step process. First, the basic text was written, and then Dr. Harris commented on it (in italics), and added variations on some of the musical examples.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 4 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Part I – Improvised Lines Scale runs In many jazz lines, you may have noticed the importance of an added half-step to allow an eighth note line to “come out right” rhythmically in 4/4 time. In other words, with an added chromatic note or two, a descending scale played in eighth notes; beginning on any degree of the scale will arrive at the first degree of the scale on the beat. To really get this under the fingers, Barry suggests practicing descending dominant seventh scales in the following way. . .
Example 1-1
. . . . and so on, up to the run beginning on the seventh note of the scale.
Example 1-2
You can see that any scale run originating on a chord tone requires one added half-step, positioned between the eighth and seventh degrees of the scale. A scale run starting on a non-chord tone requires either no half-steps, or two. The two are positioned between the ninth and eighth, and the eighth and seventh degrees.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 5 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
These runs should be practiced first of all on their own, for technical facility and secondly, used in any V or II-V situation.
Example 1-3
For major and minor scale runs, the principle is similar, except the first added half-step occurs between the sixth and fifth degrees of the scale, instead of the eighth and seventh.
Example 1-4
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 6 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
In addendum 1 and 2, I've transcribed a Barry Harris blues and solo. Notice how he uses added half-steps in bars 7, 10, 15, 16, and 24 of his solo on “Stay Right With It”. But clearly, Barry's lines are much more than eighth-note runs with added half-steps. Here are some suggestions he makes for introducing more rhythmic and melodic variety to these runs. 1) Try adding a triplet.
Example 1-5
2) Try pivoting. That is, play part of the descending scale run up an octave. You can pivot from any note of a scale run. Play the following exercise, and see which ones sound stronger.
Example 1-6
Some basic motifs Barry also teaches certain melodic motifs which are commonly used in bebop phrases. These should be played in all keys, and with the following rhythm:
Example 1-7
Note that the turn of direction in these motifs occurs at a certain place. In the case of motif A, the note G - the fifth degree of the C scale - is the one which is stated before the downward leap leading to a change of direction. With motif B, the F - the fourth - is stated Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 7 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
before dropping down. In motif C, one arrives at the third before dropping, and in the case of motif D, we reach the second before changing direction. Try combining these with scale runs. Here, the motif comes off the fifth of C.
Example 1-8
Here, the turns come off the fourth of the G7 scale, and off the second of the C scale.
Example 1-9
These motifs can also be condensed to form one whole phrase, as follows.
Example 1-10
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 8 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Summary By exploring these materials - the scale runs and melodic motifs with some pivoting and rhythmic variation - you can generate great variety in your lines. The only limit is the depth of your exploration. When in an actual playing situation, some surprisingly fresh ideas can surface. I've presented only a bare skeleton of Barry's approach to constructing lines. Perhaps you can begin to see how thoughtfully he has penetrated some essential elements of bebop phrasing. But of course it's not possible to convey in one sitting the breadth of his ideas. To really get the feel of his musical ideas, you must attend his classes. Within the atmosphere of one of Barry's workshops, you can really experience that intellectual quickness and heated spirit of play which is the “flame” of the music.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 9 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Addendum 1: Song Example: Stay Right With It
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 10 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Addendum 2: Solo Example: Stay Right With It (third and fourth choruses)
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 11 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Part II - Basic Chord Movement Few pianists have as fine a sense of movement in chords as Barry Harris. His understanding is based in a deep appreciation of the essential elements of harmony. Under his fingers, those simple truths blossom into a sound rich with spice and variety. To really grasp Barry's harmonic ideas, it is necessary to have a very thorough knowledge of major and minor sixth chords and diminished seventh chords. I would suggest practicing these in root position and inversions in both closed and open positions. Barry would call them short and long chords. One way to find the long chord is by swapping the top and bottom notes of a short chord.
Sixth chords, long and short For example, see how F6 short chords in root position and inversion can be lengthened.
Example 2-1
Also, play them like so:
Example 2-2
This should be done with all major and minor sixth chords. Then try the exercise in Example 2-3, which uses long chords and short chords. Continue the pattern until you get back to bar 1, an octave higher. It takes quite a bit of thinking to keep the notes arranged in the same pattern, but you will find some unusual sounds are created in this very logical structure. Play slowly and listen.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 12 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Example 2-3
Here's an example of how you might apply this idea to a II-V-I situation.
Example 2-4
Diminished chords, long and short Notice the use of the Gbdim71 chord for F7, to take us back to Bb6. This movement from a diminished chord back to a sixth chord is the basis of many harmonic progressions. A thorough understanding of this movement underlies Barry's approach to chording. Practice the diminished sevenths as you have practiced the sixths, in long and short chords.
Example 2-5
and
Example 2-6 1 Gbdim, Gbdim7, Gbo and Gbo7 all refer to the Gb diminished chord (Gb, Bbb, Dbb and Fbb) We've used the abbreviation “dim7” in the text and the symbol o in the musical examples. You will find that both variations appear in lead sheets.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 13 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Now let's look at a very simple movement from one sixth chord to another via a diminished. This movement is hidden in much of the harmony we play. First of all, move from G6 to C6
Example 2-7
Now, try these diminished passing chords. I've given these in long chords so you can immediately hear what a lovely, open, logical sound these moves can have.
Example 2-8
There are many harmonic situations based on these simple moves. Here are just a few. CMa9 to C6. Notice that the upper notes of CMa9 are in fact the notes of a G6 chord (E, G, B, D). The notes B and D can be lowered one tone to A and C, thus arriving at C6. Like so:
Example 2-9
Now use Bbdim7 to connect them.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 14 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Example 2-10
II-V-I progressions are also made of this type of movement. To see this, we must regard Dm7 - G7(b9) - C6 as F6 – Bdim7 - C6.
Example 2-11
Minor II-V-I progressions can also be understood in this way. Dm7(b5) - G7(b9) - Cm6 is also Fm6 - Bdim7 – Cm6
Example 2-12
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 15 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Using the chords In the next example, I show simple, open chords that can be used in comping (playing accompaniment) behind soloists on the first eight measures of a number of tunes that are based on the harmonic progression of “I Got Rhythm”.
Example 2-13
As another example, take a look at the first changes of “Ain't Misbehavin” (or “Slow Boat to China,” “Imagination,” and a host of other songs) where the movement is C6 - C#dim7 -Dm7 (C6 - C#dim7 - F6). Below is an eight bar progression similar to the first eight bars of “Ain't Misbehavin” See how much of it is actually a movement from sixth chord to sixth chord via the diminished. Play this while singing the melody and listen for the logic in the sound of these chords.
Example 2-14
In Part 3, the sixth/diminished relationship will be further explored and applied to movement within a chord. Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 16 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Part III - Exploring the Sixth Diminished Scale By Fiona Bicket with Barry Harris
Through searching for more and more fundamental ways of looking at harmony, Barry Harris has consistently used a special scale - the sixth diminished scale. This scale, studied in its major and minor forms, can open up a wealth of possibilities for movement within a chord. It can also widen your understanding of harmony in general. After exploring the use of this scale over the past few years, I can see that it has filled quite a gap in my harmonic knowledge and also provided me with unlimited material for creating fresh harmonic ideas. The major sixth diminished scale is the same as the diatonic major scale, but with an added note between the fifth and sixth degrees of the scale.
Major and Minor sixth diminished scales
Example 3-1
The minor sixth diminished scale is the same as the ascending form of the melodic minor, but also with an added note between the fifth and sixth.
Example 3-2 To get a feel for this scale on the piano, first practice it in thirds, like so -
Example 3-3
Notice that you must play G and A together as a third, as the note G# falls between them in the scale. It takes some time to get accustomed to this unusual configuration. Try it in other Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 17 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
keys. B.H.: “The sixth diminished scale should be taught all over the world, in classical music and all others. Here are a couple of other ways of looking at it Put your fingers down on a C6 chord - C, E, G, and A.
Example 3-4
It's a combination of two things The C and A are from one diminished chord,
Example 3-5
the E and G are from another diminished chord.
Example 3-6
And there's one additional diminished chord that's not in the C6 chord the Do7.
Example 3-7
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 18 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Some of the prettiest sounds happen when you play a diminished note like this Ab - over a minor chord. The Ab says ‘Move me.’ Diminished notes have a way of saying ‘Move me somewhere.’ ”
Example 3-8
You can begin to see the harmonic implications of the scale by building a chord up in thirds from each degree of the scale. The chord generated off the first degree of the scale is C6.
Example 3-9
And off the second degree, D diminished (Do). . .
Example 3-10
off the third degree, C6 in first inversion, and off the fourth degree, Do in first Inversion (or Fo).
Example 3-11
Example 3-12 Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 19 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Chord Scale Carry on up the scale, generating chords off each degree of the scale. You will notice that only two chords are created - C6 and Do. Also do this with C minor sixth diminished scale. You will find that the chords generated are Cm6 and Do. Now, play the whole chord scale in “short chords.”
Example 3-13
To hear this a little more clearly, play it also in “long” chords, by swapping the top and bottom notes of each chord.
Example 3-14
Another way to show it - go up the scale switching short and long.
Example 3-15
Example 3-16
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 20 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
As you can see, what we have here is a way of moving away from a sixth chord and back to the same sixth chord via the associated diminished. See how Barry uses this in the first one and a half bars of his tune “Father Flanagan”, where he moves from Bbm6 to Co and back using the Bb minor sixth diminished scale.
Example 3-17
Now look at this usage of the C major sixth diminished scale to embellish a C6 chord.
Example 3-18
The above example shows how the diminished notes of the scale can be used to create melodic movement within the chord. B.H.: “It's so pretty. She uses contrary motion. She could also have played this using parallel motion”
Example 3-19
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 21 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
B.H.: “In the following example the A and C (from the C6 chord) are held and the G, E, and A move up one degree of the C diminished sixth scale, then back. Next, the voices move up two degrees, then back. In the last example shown, they move up three degrees. You could extend this movement further. You could also move from the Am7 to the D7, as Fiona shows in her next example.”
Example 3-20
The usage of this scale is not confined to IMa or Im situations, however. For example, the C major sixth diminished scale can be used for the chord Am7. Here I've used the scale for movement in an Am7 chord as it moves to D7
Example 3-21
Practice Suggestion You can practice this type of movement by playing the chord scale, but in each chord raise and then resolve one or two of the notes involved. For example, here is the C minor sixth diminished chord scale with the top note raised and then resolved.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 22 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Example 3-22
Try raising and resolving one or two of the other notes in the chord, and see what interesting sounds can be created. For example, moving the note second from the bottom would give you this:
Example 3-23
Try applying some of these sounds to a II – V situation. The C minor sixth diminished scale can be used for Am7(b5). B.H.: “Try this: move the pattern down one whole step at a time, ending with a run up the keyboard. (See Example 3-24) How to execute this run? Divide it between the hands. At first, play it in “clumps.” Then, when you play it as a run, the hands stay in shape, but rotate a little, to separate the clumps into absolutely even notes. Play in hand positions . . I am a firm believer in not playing with your fingers. A notewise procedure gets you in trouble.”
Example 3-24
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 23 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
When you begin to use these sounds in their appropriate contexts you can soon see a real connection between the sixth chords found in the original sheet music of standard tunes and our modern chord voicings. Now, we often use other bass notes, and we often leave unresolved diminished notes in our chords. CMa9, for example, is C6 with two unresolved diminished notes - B and D. But the true sixth sound, if only we could recognize it, is still intact. You have already seen one example of this - C6 to D7, or IV to V, in place of IIm7 to V. Another example is Cm6 to D7, or IVm6 to V, in place of IIm7(b5) to V. Knowing this can help you find the appropriate sixth diminished scale to generate movement. For dominant seventh chords, the choice of scale depends on the context (or melody note). For most “altered” dominants, the minor sixth diminished scale found a half step above the root note will work. Play this chord.
Example 3-25
Do you see how this C7(+ 5b9) is Dbm6/C? Here's an example of Barry's, showing how you can put this knowledge to work, using moving thirds from the scale.
Example 3-26
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 24 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Summary There are many ways of exploring and applying these scales. Above all, let your ear guide you; but never be afraid to let your intellect, governed by the logic of this harmonic material, take you into new areas. Many of the questions I've heard uttered in Barry's workshops –“What if we did it backwards?” or “in contrary motion?” “How about moving the left hand instead of the right?” - reflect the playfulness which can be at work in this kind of harmonic exploration.
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 25 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
List of Music Examples Example 1-1.......................................................................................................................................................5 Example 1-2.......................................................................................................................................................5 Example 1-3.......................................................................................................................................................6 Example 1-4.......................................................................................................................................................6 Example 1-5.......................................................................................................................................................7 Example 1-6.......................................................................................................................................................7 Example 1-7.......................................................................................................................................................7 Example 1-8.......................................................................................................................................................8 Example 1-9.......................................................................................................................................................8 Example 1-10.....................................................................................................................................................8 Example 2-1.....................................................................................................................................................12 Example 2-2.....................................................................................................................................................12 Example 2-3.....................................................................................................................................................13 Example 2-4.....................................................................................................................................................13 Example 2-5.....................................................................................................................................................13 Example 2-6.....................................................................................................................................................13 Example 2-7.....................................................................................................................................................14 Example 2-8.....................................................................................................................................................14 Example 2-9.....................................................................................................................................................14 Example 2-10...................................................................................................................................................15 Example 2-11...................................................................................................................................................15 Example 2-12...................................................................................................................................................15 Example 2-13...................................................................................................................................................16 Example 2-14...................................................................................................................................................16 Example 3-1.....................................................................................................................................................17 Example 3-2.....................................................................................................................................................17 Example 3-3.....................................................................................................................................................17 Example 3-4.....................................................................................................................................................18 Example 3-5.....................................................................................................................................................18 Example 3-6.....................................................................................................................................................18 Example 3-7.....................................................................................................................................................18 Example 3-8.....................................................................................................................................................19 Example 3-9.....................................................................................................................................................19 Example 3-10...................................................................................................................................................19 Example 3-11...................................................................................................................................................19 Example 3-12...................................................................................................................................................19 Example 3-13...................................................................................................................................................20 Example 3-14...................................................................................................................................................20 Example 3-15...................................................................................................................................................20 Example 3-16...................................................................................................................................................20 Example 3-17...................................................................................................................................................21 Example 3-18...................................................................................................................................................21 Example 3-19...................................................................................................................................................21 Example 3-20...................................................................................................................................................22 Example 3-21...................................................................................................................................................22 Example 3-22...................................................................................................................................................23 Example 3-23...................................................................................................................................................23 Example 3-24...................................................................................................................................................23 Example 3-25...................................................................................................................................................24 Example 3-26...................................................................................................................................................24 Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 26 of 27
Issue 1.0 - The Barry Harris approach to Improvised Lines & Harmony: An Introduction
Last Page of Document This page is intentionally blank
Copyright © 2001 BarryHarris.com. All rights reserved This document is subject to copyrights owned by BarryHarris.com and other individuals or entities. Any reproduction, retransmission, or re-publication of all or part of this document is expressly prohibited, unless BarryHarris.com or the copyright owner of the material has expressly granted its prior written consent to so reproduce, re-transmit, or republish the material.
Page 27 of 27